EPIC Program Areas

ACE EPIC Interns have degrees and/or experience in following, but not restricted to the following disciplines:

Natural Resource Management  - Ÿ Biology  - Ÿ Ecology  - Ÿ Conservation  - Ÿ Entomology  Ÿ-  Botany  - Ÿ Rangeland Management    Ÿ Environmental Science  - Ÿ Wildlife Biology  -Ÿ  Zoology  - Ÿ Forestry  - Ÿ Environmental Studies  - Ÿ Recreation Management  - Ÿ Geology    Ÿ Paleontology  - Ÿ Geography  -  Ÿ Archaeology  - Ÿ Cultural Resource Management

ACE EPIC offers a large variety of natural science and conservation oriented internships that have been refined to specific program areas; an overview of some of these program areas is as follows:

Cultural Resources

EPIC Interns working in the area of cultural resources will have the opportunity to work in various localities, with ample availability of hands-on projects and initiatives, and with the presence of experienced agency mentors to provide guidance. The key project areas dealt with in the field of cultural resources are the preservation of historical and cultural landscapes and structures, applied research in archeology, historical and cultural anthropology, education and community outreach, and the management of museum collections. Interns should expect to work in highly specialized areas and intricate types of conservation that fall within the broad range of responsibilities of the cultural resources vocation. Applicants should have a bachelor’s degree in a discipline applicable to the field of cultural resources.

Environmental Policy, NEPA, GIS

EPIC Interns working within the realm of environmental policy will often work closely and in conjunction with Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and  the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) processes. NEPA  was established in 1969 by the federal government to ensure that all agencies of the federal government prepare an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) when they prepare, permit and undertake major federal actions and projects that could significantly affect the environment. These projects could include new recreation trails, proposed restoration sites, and other ecological projects occurring on public lands. NEPA facilitates and streamline the environmental review process and project planning for various environmental fields and includes organizing records, databases, document preparation, and review. GIS databases are essential components to many public land management projects and programs, to organize, inventory and manage resource data, as well as create maps and other compliance documents. EPIC Interns working in GIS and environmental policy will gain a strong understanding of the different policies and procedures that relate to various resource management project and programs, from wildlife biology, recreation, to cultural resources.

Forestry

Intern positions focused in the specialized field of forestry can work in variety of locations and under the supervision of various land management agencies.  EPIC interns will gain experience with a wide range of tasks and initiatives —all of which are united together under the umbrella term “forestry”— and which include: hazardous tree removal; collecting and entering field information into agency databases; forest vegetation management; native habitat restoration; ecological restoration; native seed collection; nursery management; and restoration site maintenance. EPIC interns work within the BLM, NPS, USFS, and other partners in exciting and challenging forestry career-oriented positions that open the opportunity to learn hands-on a wealth of invaluable knowledge and experiences.

Interpretation, Education, and Outreach

Intern positions focused in interpretation, education, and outreach will deal with —in the support of whichever agency they happen to be working within— the education of youth, teachers, and communities in the significant aspects of natural and cultural resources, conservation, and ecologically sound practices. The curriculum and programs are often tailored to the missions of the agencies and the circumstances of the environment in which the intern is working in and with, whether it is the BLM, NPS, the Catalina Island Conservancy, or one of ACE EPIC’s numerous other project partners.

Invasive Vegetation Management

Intern positions focused in the management of invasive plants, including monitoring, treatment, and removal, will work in a variety of locations —some of which are tremendously hostile to the unprepared— and under the direction of agency botanists and mentors. The need to keep invasive species in check is a paramount issue for the preservation and conservation of lands under the stewardship of the BLM, NPS, USFWS, USFS, and other conservation groups. Through EPIC, qualified intern candidates will be placed in positions to learn and manage the growing threat that invasive species pose in the present and for the future of native ecosystems.

Rangeland Management

EPIC interns with career aspirations in the specialized field of rangeland management are often partnered with the Bureau of Land Management, with the millions of acres of rangeland under its stewardship. The purpose of managing the nation’s rangeland is rooted in the protection of wildlife habitats and wildlife resources, supervision of livestock grazing, and management of recreation and its associated resources.  EPIC interns will assist rangeland managers and other BLM resource specialists in accomplishing the following types work: surveys, monitoring, maintenance, habitat assessments, invasive species management, restoration, botany, data entry, and habitat protection along with other duties associated with public land stewardship.

EPIC interns with career aspirations in the specialized field of rangeland management are often partnered with the Bureau of Land Management, with the millions of acres of rangeland under its stewardship. The purpose of managing the nation’s rangeland is rooted in the protection of wildlife habitats and wildlife resources, supervision of livestock grazing, and management of recreation and its associated resources.  EPIC interns will assist rangeland managers and other BLM resource specialists in accomplishing the following types work: surveys, monitoring, maintenance, habitat assessments, invasive species management, restoration, botany, data entry, and habitat protection along with other duties associated with public land stewardship.

Recreation

The field of land management in the United States is intrinsically linked to the existence of a general philosophy necessitating that public lands should be available for recreational use by the general populace. Nearly all EPIC intern positions will include —to a modest degree— dealings with public recreation. Some intern positions will place more of an emphasis on recreation initiatives than others, but restoration work, education and outreach, policy, GIS, and land stewardship are key components of keeping public lands available for the public’s recreational use. All ACE EPIC interns interested in a career in conservation and public land management should be well-versed and prepared for the issues that recreation presents in relation to both their vocational aspiration and internship position.

Wilderness

Interns with ambitions to work in the field of wilderness conservation and management may work within and under the supervision of several land management agencies, which include: the BLM, NPS, USFWS, USFS, and other project partners. EPIC wilderness interns will be involved with the planning, designing, and carrying out conventional operation work and assigned projects within the areas of wilderness/recreation programs. Wilderness interns may often monitor backcountry and other recreation areas for off-highway vehicle (OHV) and other types of land use, and gather geospatial data on these types of incursions, monitor water resources, collect wilderness character, ecological surveying, and assist with activities such as construction/maintenance of fences and other barriers, installing signs, and minor rehabilitation of existing restoration sites like vehicle damaged lands. Learn more about the ACE EPIC Wilderness Fellows Program!

Wildlife and Fisheries Management

Interns with ambitions to work within the field of wildlife and fisheries management should be prepared to work in a wide-variety of locations and conditions and be able to adapt to completing  tasks not limited to one specific initiative. A career in wildlife and fisheries management often combines field research, surveying, and monitoring of both species and habitats. Internships often include working within a variety of ecosystems, habitat assessments, and restoration.

This vocation is generally requires interns to be well-versed in the areas of botany, zoology, ecology, biology, wildlife, fisheries, entomology, and other related disciplines.